Potato Hamburger Buns

Potato Hamburger Rolls | Bakewell Junction

Potato Hamburger Rolls | Bakewell Junction

I’m still on a quest for the perfect recipe that reminds me of the Martin’s Potato Bread.  With July 4th this week, I decided to try a new potato roll recipe for hamburgers. They turned out to be large enough for sliders or dinner rolls.  These rolls look tall but once they’re filled and you start eating, you won’t think there’s too much bread.  I think these rolls would be lovely for cold cut sandwiches, pulled pork or anything you would eat on a bun. Really.

My brother-in-law and husband didn’t think these were like the store bought rolls but that they were a fantastic roll anyway.  We ate the first three warm out of the oven with a little butter.  They were soft and fluffy as they should be.  My husband is already making plans for me to make two batches of these for the Fourth.

Then we ate a few more buns for dinner with hamburgers, sauteed vidalia onions and baked beans.

Have a wonderful and safe Fourth of July!

Enjoy!

Potato Hamburger Rolls | Bakewell Junction

Potato Hamburger Rolls | Bakewell Junction

Potato Hamburger Rolls3 | Bakewell Junction

Potato Hamburger Rolls | Bakewell Junction

Potato Hamburger Rolls

Yield:  15 – 20 rolls                  Cook Time:  20 minutes

Dough:

  • 2 tablespoons warm water
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons instant (or Bread Machine) yeast; equivalent of 1 package of yeast
  • 1 cup water boiling potato water or 1 cup boiling water with 1 tablespoon of potato flakes
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 2 beaten eggs
  • 4 to 4 1/2 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup potato flour

Topping:

  • Milk, cream or egg yolk to glaze (optional)

Directions:

Step 1:  For the dough:  Heat 2 tablespoons in a microwave safe small bowl or a 1 cup measure for 5 to 10 seconds to warm.  Dissolve the 1/2 teaspoon of sugar in the warm water.  Add the yeast and mix briefly to combine.  Set aside for about 10 minutes until the mixture begins to foam.

Step 2:  In the interim, add the potato flakes, sugar, salt and butter to the boiling water and mix.  Add the potato water and yeast mixtures to the large bowl of a stand mixer and mix briefly.  Mix in the eggs and 2 cups of flour.  Beat in the remaining 2 cups of flour.  Continue using the beater attachment and beat for 3 to 5 minutes.  This is a sticky dough.  At this point you can refrigerate covered up to a week.

Step 3:  If you aren’t refrigerating the dough, you may need to add an additional 1/2 cup of flour to the dough for easier handling.  Be sure not to add too much flour, as it should remain sticky.  Let dough rest for 1/2 hour.  Grease a 9 by 13 inch pan with cooking spray or line with parchment.  To prepare for baking, using well floured hands, divide the dough into 15 to 20 pieces.  Roll into balls and place into the prepared pan.  I was able to place the rolls in 3 by 5 rows in the pan.  I had three additional rolls that I put into a small loaf pan for a total of 18 rolls.  Set rolls in a warm area to rise until doubled.  If you don’t have a warm area, create one using my tip below.

Step 4:  Preheat oven to 375 degrees.   Place rolls in preheated oven for 20 minutes.  Longer if you’re rolls are larger; less if they’re smaller.  Optionally brush with the topping 5 minutes before the rolls are finished baking.  So if you’re baking for 20 minutes, brush the tops at 15 minutes and then let them finish baking for the remaining 5 minutes.

Step 5:  Let the rolls cool 10 minutes.  Remove the rolls from the pan and let them cool completely.  Break the buns apart.  Slice horizontally when ready to use for hamburgers.

Tips:  To create a warm environment, you can boil a pot of water while preparing the dough and place the water and dough in a cold oven.  The boiling water will create a warm moist environment in the oven for the dough to rise well.

Storing:  Store in a sealed plastic container for a few days.

Enjoy!!!

Recipe slightly adapted from The Kitchn, Easy Potato Dough Rolls recipe.

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Potato Hot Dog Rolls #TwelveLoaves June

Potato Hot Dog Buns | Bakewell Junction

Potato Hot Dog Buns | Bakewell Junction

This month’s TwelveLoaves linky party theme is summer buns and I wasn’t sure what summer buns were.  After looking at the other submissions and considering that today is Father’s Day, I thought I’d like to try hot dog buns.  Lots of folks grill and barbeque hot dogs today and all summer long, so why not?

My favorite store bought buns are Martin’s potato buns.  I use them all the time and I wanted to try making buns at home that would be like the store bought buns.  As it turned out, these hot dog buns were really good but not like the store bought ones I was trying to emulate.  My husband thought these were better than the Martin’s buns.

This is a relatively easy recipe and I recommend you give it a try.  The potato flour helps the buns from becoming hard.

Hope everyone had a great Father’s Day!

Enjoy!

Potato Hot Dog Rolls

Yield:  12 – 14 rolls                  Cook Time:  20 minutes

Dough:

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 1 1/4 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 3 cups flour
  • 1/4 cup potato flour
  • 2 tablespoons non-fat dry milk powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons sugar

Topping:

  • 1 – 2 tablespoons milk

Directions:

Step 1:  For the dough:  Heat milk to 110 degrees in a microwave safe small bowl or a 2 cup measure.  I heated the milk in the microwave in small intervals until the thermometer read 110 degrees.  Add the tablespoon of sugar and the yeast and mix briefly to combine.  Set aside for about 10 minutes until the mixture begins to foam.

Step 2:  In the interim, set up your electric stand mixer with the dough hook attachment.  Add the flours, the dry milk powder and salt to the mixer bowl.  Turn on the mixer on low to combine the dry ingredients.  Then add in the olive oil and yeast mixture.  Scrape down the sides of the bowl to ensure the flour is incorporated.  Let the mixer knead the dough for five minutes.

Step 3:  Generously dust a clean work surface with flour, as the dough is very sticky.  Transfer the dough onto the floured work surface.  Scrape the sides of the bowl to get as much of the dough as possible.

Step 4:  With floured hands, flatten the dough and fold it over on itself six or seven times.  Using a greased bench scraper or knife cut the dough into 12 to 14 pieces.  Let the dough rest for 10 minutes.

Step 5:  Prepare a baking sheet by lining it with parchment paper or spraying it with cooking spray.  Shape the pieces of dough into 1 inch by 8 inch buns.  Place the formed doughs side-by-side onto the baking sheet, about 1 inch apart.  Cover with plastic wrap and let rise for 45 minutes in a warm place or use my tip below to create a warm environment.  The dough should double in size.

Step 6:  Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Brush the tops of the buns with the milk.  Bake the buns for 15 to 20 minutes.  Let the buns cool completely.  Break the buns apart and slice horizontally.  Fill with your favorite hot dogs and toppings.  You can also fill with Italian sausage.

Tips:  To create a warm environment, you can boil a pot of water while preparing the dough and place the water and dough in a cold oven.  The boiling water will create a warm moist environment in the oven for the dough to rise well.

Storing:  Store in a sealed plastic container for a few days.

Enjoy!!!

Recipe adapted from King Arthur Flour, Rosemary Potato Rolls recipe.

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What is baking this June in the TwelveLoaves kitchens?

#TwelveLoaves June:  Summer buns!  Summer is all about lazy mornings and easy lunches.  Outside barbecues and lots of grilling!  Share your favorite summer bun recipe (sweet or savory).  Let’s get baking!

Look at what our very talented #TwelveLoaves bakers have created this June!

Want to join the #TwelveLoaves group?  It’s easy!
1. When you post your Twelve Loaves bread on your blog, make sure that you mention the Twelve Loaves challenge in your blog post; this helps us to get more members as well as share everyone’s posts.  Please make sure that your Bread is inspired by the theme!
2. Please link your post to the linky tool at the bottom of my blog.  It must be a bread baked to the Twelve Loaves theme.
3. Have your Twelve Loaves bread that you baked this June 2013 and posted on your blog by June 30, 2013.

You are next… Click here to enter

May theme: Focaccia
June theme: Corn Rolls
July theme: Challah
August theme: Summer Fruit
September: Say CHEESE!
October: Seeds, nuts and grains
November: Autumn Fruits: Apples and Pears
December: Boozy Bread
January: Clean Slate
February: Open Challenge
March: Holiday Breads
April: Berries
May: Open theme

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See what’s freshly baked for #TwelveLoaves on the growing Pinterest board.

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Prosciutto Bread (aka Lard Bread)

There’s a bread that can be found at most Italian deli’s in New York City – it  used to be called Lard Bread but it’s been referred to more recently as Prosciutto Bread.  It’s an unbelievably delicious bread and I’ve always wanted to make a homemade version of it.  Some of my research stated that the bread is usually prepared for Easter but I don’t recall that being the case.  What I do recall is thinking that there should be more prosciutto and less black pepper.  By baking the bread myself, I can change it to my taste.

When I’m having antipasto, I normally like to buy Parma Prosciutto (which tastes out of this world) but when you’re cooking with it, there’s no need to use the most expensive one.

For Mother’s Day, I tried two different Prosciutto Bread recipes and my family absolutely loved this one.  I had to hide some of the remaining loaf, so I would have some for the pictures in this post.

Enjoy.

After kneading the dough needs to rest.

Ready for the oven.

Hot out of the oven.

Take a bite after tearing the bread into a nice big hunk.

Prosciutto Bread

Yield:  1 loaf                Cook Time:  30 – 35 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 plus 3 tbsp cups bread flour, divided
  • 1 tbsp. malt powder (or 1 tbsp sugar)
  • 3/4 tsp. instant yeast
  • 1/2 tsp. coarsely ground black pepper (I used regular grind pepper and a scant 1/2 tsp)
  • 3/4 tsp. salt
  • 1 cup water (70F -90F)
  • 8 oz. Prosciutto, 1/8″ thick, cut into 1/4-inch dice (no need to use Parma Prosciutto for this bread and you can substitute salami, sweet capicolo or pancetta or, if you don’t like the meats, you can try cheese but you should probably use half the amount)
  • 4 tsp. bacon fat, lard, or butter, melted

Directions:

Step 1:  Mix 2 cups flour, malt powder and yeast in a stand mixer.  Combine salt with flour mixture – this is done separately from the first mixing so the salt doesn’t retard the action of the yeast.

Step 2:  Add water to mixing bowl and mix with flour with dough hook on low to moisten.  Knead for seven minutes on medium speed.  Mix in prosciutto on low speed.  Dough should be slightly tacky but not sticky.  If dough is too sticky knead in more flour a little at a time.  If the dough is too dry, spray with a bit of water and knead.

Step 3:  Shape dough into a ball and place on a lightly floured surface.  Sprinkle dough with flour, cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 20 minutes.

Step 4:  Roll dough into an 18” cylinder and form into a ring.  Ensure the ends stick together and place on parchment paper on a large cookie sheet.  Spray dough with cooking spray and cover with plastic wrap.  Let rise in a warm draft-free place until doubled for about 1 hour.  I usually heat my oven to the lowest setting and then shut it off before placing dough into it to allow it to rise.  Also, I like to let the last rise happen overnight but I didn’t have time for that this time.

Step 5:  Use a pizza stone or baking sheet on a low shelf of the oven and place a baking sheet on the lowest shelf of the oven (or on the bottom of the oven if your heating element isn’t on the bottom of the oven).  Preheat oven to 450 degrees for at least 10 minutes.

Step 6:  Transfer bread to pizza stone or baking sheet in the preheated oven and brush with about 1/3 of melted butter.  Add about half to a dozen ice cubes into the baking sheet on lowest shelf of the oven.

Step 7:  Bake 15 minutes.  Remove parchment paper and turn bread front to back to allow for even baking.  Brush bread with about another 1/3 of melted butter.  Add another dozen ice cubes.  Bake another 5 minutes.  Reduce temperature to 400 degrees.  Bake another 10 to 15 minutes.

Step 8:  Turn off oven and leave bread in the oven with door propped open for another 5 minutes.

Step 9:  Remove bread from oven and brush with the remaining butter.  Allow to cool but if you aren’t having company or bringing this bread to a function, this bread tastes delicious slightly warm and crispy.

Enjoy!!!

Recipe adapted from Seriously Good (originally from Rose Levy Beranbaum’s The Bread Bible).

Irish Soda Bread 2

Saint Patrick’s day has come and gone.  Spring has sprung early this year and my Crocus have bloomed already.

Back to the Irish Soda Bread…

I baked another version of Irish Soda Bread.  This version isn’t like the one I remember but it’s quite tasty.  My taste testers have classified it as delicious.  This one bakes up like a cake.  I got the recipe from an Irish co-worker and then modified it.

After mixing together the ingredients, the mixture looks like this.

Ready for the oven.

Hot out of the oven.

Irish Soda Bread

Yield:  2 loaves                Cook Time:  30 – 40 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 cups sifted all-purpose unbleached flour
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
  • 1 cups raisins, soaked in water for 15 to 20 minutes and drained well
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 large egg, well beaten

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.  Generously butter 2 9-inch round cake pans or pie pans.  Alternately, you can use cooking spray instead of butter.

Mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and baking soda together.  Add the butter, well beaten egg, sour cream, milk and raisins to the flour mixture.  Place in the pans.  It’s traditional to cut a cross in the top of the bread before baking but this version is too soft for that.

Bake for 30 – 40 minutes.  Test with a toothpick for doneness.  Cool in the pans for 15 minutes.  Transfer to a wire rack to cool.

Enjoy!!!

Recipe adapted from a co-worker’s recipe.  The original recipe follows, if you’d like to try that version.

Irish Soda Bread – Original Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups all-purpose unbleached flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
  • 1 cups raisins, soaked in water for 15 to 20 minutes and drained well
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 large egg, well beaten
  • 2 teaspoons caraway seeds

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.  Generously butter 1 9-inch round cake pan or pie pan.  Alternately, you can use cooking spray instead of butter.

Mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and baking soda together.  Add the butter, well beaten egg, sour cream, milk, raisins and caraway seeds to the flour mixture.  Place in the pans.  It’s traditional to cut a cross in the top of the bread before baking.

Bake for 40 minutes.  Test with a toothpick for doneness.  Cool in the pan for 15 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool.

Irish Soda Bread 1

Saint Patrick’s day is in a few days and although I’m not Irish I have a penchant for Irish Soda Bread.  During my undergraduate years I worked at a sales rep company and while that information is unimportant, what is important is that I had a co-worker whose last name was Sullivan and his mother made tons of Irish Soda Bread and sent it to him.  Since he couldn’t eat it all, he brought most of them to us at work.  I’ve never had Irish Soda Bread that was as good or with the same texture.  It’s hard to explain because the bread was sweeter than any other recipe I’ve had and it wasn’t as dry or as brown.  It was sort of like a scone.  Unfortunately I never asked for the recipe and I’ve been looking for something similar since but I’ve never found it.

This recipe is quite tasty and moist; sort of like a quick bread.  I’ve modified the original recipe to my tastes.  I normally send a couple of loaves to a friend that I don’t get to see too often and she loves it.  She freezes it so she can have some whenever she likes.  I hope you enjoy this recipe too.

After stirring together the dry ingredients and cutting in the butter and mixing very thoroughly with your hands until it gets grainy, the mixture looks like this.

After mixing is competed.

Ready for the oven.

Hot out of the oven.  Ready, set, eat.

Irish Soda Bread

Yield:  2 or 3 loaves                Cook Time:  50 – 60 minutes

Ingredients

  • 5 cups sifted all-purpose unbleached flour
  • 2 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 pound (1 stick) butter
  • 1 1/4 cups raisins, soaked in water for 15 to 20 minutes and drained
  • 2 1/2 cups buttermilk or substitute 2 ½ tablespoons lemon juice to 2 ½ cups milk, stir and wait 10 to 15 minutes
  • 2 large eggs, slightly beaten

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Generously butter 2 9 x 5 inch pans or 3 8 x 4 inch pans.  Alternatively you can use cooking spray.

Stir together the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and baking soda.  Cut in the butter with a pastry blender at first and then mix very thoroughly with your hands until it gets grainy.  Stir in raisins.

Add the buttermilk and egg to the flour mixture.  Stir until well moistened.  Pour mixture into 2 or 3 loaf pans.

Bake for to 50 – 60 minutes.  Test with a toothpick for doneness.  Cool in the pans for 3 to 5 minutes.  Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Enjoy!!!

Recipe adapted from www.foodnetwork.com, courtesy of Brother Rick Curry, The Secrets of Jesuit Breadmaking, HaperPerennial, 1995.